Is Your Posture Affecting Your Running?

When considering your running form — whether to improve your time, mileage or preventing injuries — an important element that is forgotten all too often is your posture. Admittedly, as runners we already have a million and one things to consider every time we hit the road (or trail) — where are my feet landing? Am I overstriding? How many more miles? What’s my pace? The list goes on. It can be a challenge to add in yet another form faux-pas to avoid, especially when we’re running long distances and battling fatigue.

4 Common Running Injuries and How to Avoid Them

If you’re a runner of any distance, you’ve probably already experienced your fair share of aches and pains in various parts of your body. Some of these aches, like sore abs or a little tenderness in your muscles after a tough run or a hard strength training workout is perfectly normal and is probably a good sign that you’re pushing yourself within your limits.

Is Your Ground Contact Time Slowing You Down?

When watching professional and elite athletes run, one thing you’ll notice, aside from their incredible speed, is that their running form makes them look like they are effortlessly gliding through the air. Look carefully and you’ll see that many of them have impressive stride lengths, very little bounce, and smooth transitions from foot to foot.

A Better Way to Run Faster

In a previous post, we discussed the dangers of overstriding and how it is one of the most common faux-pas of running form, as well as a very common cause of injury for many runners. The solution there was to increase your cadence to reduce stride length, which also affects your other running biomechanics like bounce and braking — both measures of running efficiency.

What Is Running Biomechanics and Why Is It Important?

Running biomechanics refers to the mechanical laws relating to movement and structure of our bodies when running. In other words, it looks at how we run through focusing on aspects like how our muscles and joints function during running. These include things like foot strike patterns, pelvic movements, ground contact time, etc. It is basically a deep-dive measure of your running form.

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