Suffering from Chronic Inflammation? These 3 exercises just might help

When the body sustains an injury, it reacts by initiating an inflammatory process to increase nutrients to the injured area and promote healing. This process is marked by redness, warmth, and swelling in the area. This is an important part of recovering the health of the body’s tissue. But sometimes a problem occurs when this inflammatory cascade is not “turned off,” leaving the body in a state of chronic inflammation.

How to Prevent and Correct Forward Head Posture

The human race has made some amazing technological strides in recent years. Think about it: how many intricate electronic devices do you use in the run of a day? Chances are you wake up to an alarm each morning on your smartphone, listen to music on a tiny mp3 player at the gym, and maybe check your email from a tablet during a coffee break. You might work in a cubicle in front of a computer, or at least a decent percentage of your work day probably involves looking at a computer screen. After work, perhaps you take a bus or subway home and spend the transit time looking down at your phone; sending texts, checking social media accounts, and online window shopping. Thanks to some very talented software engineers, we are able to document every minute of our lives and have the answers to all of our questions at our fingertips.

Invigorating Stretches to get you through your Midday Slump

Who doesn’t feel tired after lunch at work? Brain fog and lethargy in the afternoon are common problems many people face in the workplace or even at home. While an afternoon cup of coffee may pick you right up, there are natural alternatives that can be just as invigorating- and they don’t have any side effects! Next time you feel sluggish midday, try stretching your body instead and notice how it makes you feel. Here are some you can try today:

11 Easy Office Stretches to Reduce Back and Neck Pain (Infographic)

If you work at a desk, you’re probably all too familiar with the aches and pains that come with prolonged sitting. Stiff, tired muscles, aching backs and tension in the neck are unfortunate side effects that many people deal with on a regular basis. Fortunately, a few simple routines can help relieve tension, give your muscles a break, and change the physical negativity of a day spent at your desk. For example, just thirty seconds raising each knee toward your chest gives your lower back a break. Moving your wrists back and forth after a day spent on a keyboard gives those muscles some release, too.

Try These 3 Short Exercises To Ease Your Lower Back Pain

Do you belong to the two-thirds of Americans who suffer from lower back pain? While nearly 72 percent use pain medication as a way to relieve their symptoms, more than 55 percent use heat and cold packs at home for relief. But is this getting to the root issue: our ways of moving? We’ve been hunched over our smartphones or laptops, sitting at our desk and slumped over on the couch and our body have adapted to these chronically poor positions of our modern lifestyle.

10 Stretches You Should Do Everyday At Your Desk

Finding a time and place to stretch at your workplace can be a challenge — you don’t want to be a distraction to the people around you, but it’s still important to stretch out the tense muscles in your neck and back.

Try these 10 quick stretches you can do right at your desk. They’re super easy to do and will have you feeling refreshed and refocused in no time for your next project.

The Slouchy Life of the Business Traveler

Travel is a wonderful experience for many. Gathering your things and boarding a plane or climbing into a car to set off into the distance, away from chaos where no emails or phone calls can reach you is a feeling many of us look forward to all year. Depending on your occupation, a lucky handful of us get to travel all the time — but are they actually lucky?

The Economist released an article earlier this week titled The sad, sick life of the business travellerwhich highlights some of the negative effects business travel has on an individual, based on a new study recently released by the University of Surrey in Britain, and Linnaeus University in Sweden.

It’s All About The Core: Workouts for Better Posture

Keep up with the latest posture, back health and corporate wellness news with our weekly round up of interesting and useful articles.

What’s trending this week?

We talk a lot about the importance of good posture for all of its benefits in health, well-being, appearance, and communication — not to mention the detrimental effects of poor posture on your body! And that naturally begs the questions: “well, how?”. 

Posture improvement boils down to two contributing factors: mindfulness and muscle memory. This week, we’ve collected the best of the best core and back workouts to strengthen the key muscle groups to help you sit up straighter. Let’s get started.

Best Back Strengthening Exercises

In order to maintain good posture, you need to keep your core and back muscles engaged. Many of our users report that they feel a bit sore when they first start trying to improve their posture and have asked us to recommend the best back strengthening exercises. Your wish is our command: We’ve worked with some of our favorite personal trainers to bring you a set of simple core and back strengthening exercises to help support (literally!) your quest for better posture.
Our favorite back strengthening exercises are easy to do at home, require no equipment, and, as LUMO intern Catherina shows below, can even be done in your normal street clothes! Try to perform them 2-4 times per week to build up your strength and help prevent pesky back pain.

1) Front Plank

The plank is a core-strength powerhouse that works your abs and obliques, while also helping you to strengthen your quadriceps, glutes, and shoulders. Building strength and endurance in your core will help protect your lower back from injury and strain.

How to do it: Lie on your stomach then slowly raise yourself up onto your elbows and toes. Keep your back straight and your head and neck in line with your back, shoulders directly above your elbows. Pull your abs in tight (think of drawing your belly button in toward your spine) and be sure to keep your hips down. Sticking your bottom up in the air is cheating! Aim for 2 repetitions, starting with 20-30 seconds each and working up to a minute.

How to modify it: If you have trouble holding a plank on your toes with good form, try dropping down to your knees instead, as Fiona demonstrates to the right. Keep a straight line from your shoulders to your knees and remember to keep your core sucked in tightly!

2) Side Plank

How to do it: Start by lying on your side with your feet stacked on top of each other. Keeping your elbow under your shoulder, push yourself up onto your forearm. Keep your body in a straight line from shoulder to toes, and make sure that your hips are square. Hold this position for 20-40 seconds then switch sides, aiming for a total of 2-3 repetitions per side.

How to modify it: Like the front plank, you can make this a bit easier by doing it from your knees instead of your feet. Once you’re a pro, make it harder by lifting your top leg straight up.

3) Superman

The Superman is one of the best back strengthening exercises, focused on improving your lower back strength.

 

How to do it: Begin by lying straight and face down. You can either place your hands by your ears, as Catherina demonstrates above, or extend them out in front of you so that you look like Superman flying – that’s where the exercise gets its name, after all! Simultaneously lift your arms, chest, and legs and hold your body in the raised position for 2-5 seconds. Exhale as you lift your arms and legs, then inhale as your lower yourself down into the starting position. Aim for 3 sets of 10-12 repetitions.

How to modify it: In addition to straightening your arms like Superman, you can also modify this exercise by lifting one limb at a time. Alternatively, you can choose to move your upper body and lower body separately – keep your feet on the ground and lift your chest and arms for one set, then switch and raise your legs while resting your upper body on the ground.

4) Bridge

The bridge exercise serves several purposes, making it an awesome all-around strengthener. As a back bend, it helps counteract the stress that sitting all day places on our bodies. The balance element helps you gain stability, which protects against injury. You’ll also work lots of muscles including your abs, glutes, and lower back, which all work together to help stabilize your spine and ward off back pain. Finally, it stretches out your hip flexors – stretching and lengthening your hip flexors helps to ease back pain, so we definitely recommend working to increase your flexibility in those muscles!

How to do it: Lie on your back with your feet flat on the ground and hip-width apart. Relax your arms by your sides and squeeze your gluteal muscles as you lift your hips up toward the ceiling, creating a straight line from your knees to your chest. Be sure to keep your knees parallel to each other – don’t let them splay out to the sides. Hold yourself up for three counts, then gently lower yourself back to the ground. Aim for 10-12 repetitions.

How to modify it: To make it harder, lift one leg straight up so that your foot points toward the ceiling. Keep your hips even and flex your foot. This makes the bridge substantially harder, so start with a few reps and build up to a full set. Be sure to do both sides to keep your body even and balanced.

 

Start your positive habit change today with Lumo Lift

Lumo Lift is a small lightweight wearable that tracks and coaches you on your posture, as well as tracks daily activity, such as steps taken, distance traveled and calories burned. Compatible with iOS/iPhone and select Android devices. Free shipping, 30-day money back guarantee and 1 year limited warranty.

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