6 Resistance Band Exercises to Prevent Running Injuries

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In the past few decades, running has gained speed as a popular cardio choice. Fun runs, such as foam runs, color runs, and mud runs, have made it accessible and inclusive to all. It is a great option for anyone just starting out or wanting to get back in shape. No gym equipment or membership required. All you need is a good pair of running shoes and workout clothes, and you are good to go.

However, running injuries can be discouraging, to say the least. Poor running form, muscle imbalances, or improper running shoes can all be factors contributing to an injury. Luckily, they are all completely in your control. Correct improper posture. Educate yourself and shop around for a pair of running shoes that are suited for your feet and gait. As for muscle imbalances, various resistance band exercises may reduce the risk of running injuries. The following exercises target major problem areas that may lead to injuries. By strengthening certain muscles, you may further become a more efficient and stronger runner. Always be sure to do a proper warm-up and cool down involving appropriate stretches before and after your run.

Ankle Plantarflexion

A common running form problem for many runners is excessive rolling of the feet inward, also known as overpronation. Overpronation may lead to injury, such as ankle sprains, if not properly counteracted via footwear or exercise. Ankle plantarflexion strengthening exercises can strengthen the arch of the foot, which may reduce the risk of certain running injuries.

How To

  1. Sit on the floor or mat with one leg extended in front. Wrap a resistance band around the ball of your foot. Hold the ends of the resistant band in both hands.
  2. Slowly press your foot forward against the resistance of the band, pointing your foot away from you.
  3. Slowly return to the starting position and repeat. Do 10 repetitions, 2-3 times for each leg.

Tips and Tricks

  • Keep a straight posture when sitting on the ground to avoid muscle strains.
  • Keep your hands stationary throughout the exercise.


Ankle Inversion

Ankle inversion strengthening exercises with the use of a resistance band strengthen the muscles surrounding the ankle joint and may aid in preventing common ankle sprains from occurring.

How To

  1. Sit in a chair with proper posture. Attach a resistance band to a secure object, such as a bedpost. Place your foot in the loop so that the band is secured around the ball of your foot.
  2. Slowly move the foot up and in against the resistance of the band.
  3. Slowly move the foot back to the starting position. Repeat 10 times, 2-3 sets for each leg.

Tips and Tricks

  • Hold the knee with both hands to ensure the ankle joint is isolated and there are no hip muscles involved.


Ankle Eversion

Ankle eversion is the opposite of ankle inversion. Completing resistance band exercises for both directions may decrease chances of an ankle sprain in either direction. Strengthening the muscles involved in ankle eversion will aid in supporting and stabilizing the ankle joints.

How To

  1. Sit in a chair with proper posture. Attach a resistance band to a secure object, such as a bedpost. Place your foot in the loop so that the band is secured around the ball of your foot.
  2. Slowly move the foot up and out against the resistance of the band.
  3. Slowly move the foot back to the starting position. Repeat 10 times, 2-3 sets for each leg.

Tips and Tricks

  • Hold the knee with both hands to ensure the ankle joint is isolated and there are no hip muscles involved.


Side Steps

Side steps with a resistance band increase strength of the abductors, glutes, and quadriceps, which are all commonly used when running. These muscles are important for the stability of the knee joint and may reduce conditions such as those relating to the patella from occurring.

How To

  1. Stand with your feet hip width apart, and wrap a resistance band around both knees.
  2. Squat down slightly with your knees bent and back straight.
  3. Slowly step one leg out to the side, fully planting the foot on the ground.
  4. Carefully allow the other foot to follow bringing the feet back to hip width apart.
  5. Do 10 repetitions each way, 2-3 times for each leg.

Tips and Trick

  • Make sure to maintain a proper posture and to engage the core to protect the lower back.
  • To make the exercise more challenging, wrap the resistance band around the ankles.


Monster Walk

The monster walk exercise focuses on strengthening the abductor muscles, the outer portion of the legs, and the glutes. The monster walk may help strengthen and increase lateral stability of the legs, reducing injuries related to the IT band.

How To

  1. Stand with your feet hip-width apart, and wrap a resistance band around both knees.
  2. Bend the knees to 45 degrees.
  3. Keep your back straight.
  4. Take a step forward with one foot, and follow with the opposite foot.
  5. Repeat stepping forward for 10 repetitions.
  6. Repeat all steps, but step backward for 10 repetitions.
  7. Do 2-3 times each way.

Tips and Tricks

  • Make sure to maintain a proper posture and to engage the core to protect the lower back.
  • Like the ‘Side Steps’ exercise, to make it more challenging, wrap the resistance band around the ankles.


Hip Abduction

The hip muscles aid in strengthening and stabilizing the movements of the knee. Strengthening of the hip abductor muscles further increase lateral stability that may prevent running injuries such as those involving the IT band and improve running form.

How To

  1. Lie on your side on the ground or on a mat.
  2. Wrap the resistance band around both ankles.
  3. Keep a very slight bend in the knees.
  4. Slowly lift the top leg against the resistance of the band.
  5. Slowly lower, and repeat for 10 repetitions, 2-3 times.
  6. Repeat for the opposite leg.

Tips and Tricks

  • Do not rotate the trunk of the body throughout the exercise. Engage the core to prevent this from happening.
  • Do not lock the knees. Always keep a slight bend in both knees.

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Melissa

About Melissa

Melissa is the Community and Content Marketing Manager at Lumo Bodytech. She spends her free time reading, doing karaoke, and training for her next triathlon.

2 Comments

  • DA Bell-Paris
    DA Bell-Paris
    24.08.2017

    Great article Melissa! So do you think this workout might be good for post run? After cooldpwn and stretching of course.

    • Melissa Wilder
      Melissa Wilder
      24.08.2017

      Yes, after a workout or even on your off days!

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