Technology That Helps You
Move Better.

Solutions to every day movements.

Technology That Helps You Move Better.

All day solutions to everyday movements.

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How Lumo Founder Andrew Chang Beat Back Pain

Chronic back pain is far too common in our modern lives, and nobody knows this better than Lumo co-founder Andrew Chang. Andrew leveraged his Stanford education into a very successful career with the US Department of Energy. He became fascinated by using technology to drive human optimization.

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10 Easy Ways to Manage Lower Back Pain at Home

Imagine several years ago you were involved in a serious car accident, during which time your back was injured, resulting in the need for some medical intervention.  Recently, and due to the lingering effects of the wreck, your family doctor suggested that you may have some osteoarthritis in your spine.  To top it all off, your office job requires a lot of sitting during the day, which frequently leads to episodes of lower back pain flare-ups.  Those onsets usually present with soreness, tightness, and occasionally down right sharp pains targeting your susceptible lower back muscles.

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10 Fast Facts about Middle Back Pain

You spent several hours today at the office moving some heavy boxes of client files, a process that required a lot of bending and twisting.  The middle portion of your back, injured a few years ago in an automobile accident, is now paying the price.  It seems tight, stiff and achy, and you can even feel a slight burning sensation when you twist to the left or to the right.  Something has to be done for your middle back pain issues, as it’s already cost you time off from your job, at which you typically sit for hours every day while tasking away at your desk.

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A Beginner’s Guide to Preventing and Correcting Forward Head Posture

Another busy workday at the office is drawing to a close.  You’ve spent the past 3 hours hunched over in front of your desk, leaning in and squinting intently at figures on your computer screen.  As you get up from your chair, a sharp pain radiates from the base of your skull, down through your neck, and on into your arms.  Your left hand feels a bit numb and as you stand up you notice a dull ache and tightness in your neck muscles.  Now that you’ve disengaged your gaze from the computer screen, you realize that a headache has come on; something that you’ve dealt with more frequently nowadays.

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A Complete Guide to Fixing Your Posture

During a typical work day, for example, if your job is in an office setting and you spend countless hours seated while squinting at a computer screen, most of us unknowingly experience poor posture.  What exactly does that look like?  Well, incorrect posture manifests when we slouch, with our chin pointed down, shoulders and upper back rounded forward, and our spines scrunched.  As a result, there are many undesirable physical, social and even emotional outcomes that can result from using poor posture.

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10 Fast Facts about Lower Back Pain

The human back is an amazing structure, designed to support our spines in a natural, upright position.  When we put undue stress upon its muscles, especially in the lower back area, pain eventually will manifest as a warning signal that our body is injured.  For example, when you sit, or more typically slouch, for countless hours in front of your work desk, day in and day out, bad physical outcomes will probably result, including lower back pain.  Additionally, a traumatic spinal injury in your past, such as a serious car accident, predisposes you to be more vulnerable to lower back pain, while placing you at a higher risk to suffer from its effects.

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How Poor Posture Can Aggravate Back Pain

If someone studying back pain were to covertly take some snapshots of most of us during an average day, they would reveal some alarming information about how we abuse our backs.  Those incriminating photos would show us slouched over our work stations, scrunched up in our vehicles, or hunched over peering at our smart device screens.  In other words, we are quietly and figuratively “killing” our spines slowly with poor posture, and in the sordid process both facilitating the onset, while intensifying the severity, of our resulting back pain flare-ups.

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6 Commonly Overlooked Remedies for Back Pain

 You’ve been hunched over your crowded work desk for the past few hours, intently crunching numbers as you type up the latest quarterly report for your boss.  Your persistent back pain, resulting from a serious auto accident 10 years ago, has reemerged, and is reminding you of that fact via muscle aching and throbbing.  When you finally stand up to take a well-deserved break, the poor posture that your body has been locked in for half the day refuses to respond.

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A Beginner’s Guide to Sleeping with Lower Back Pain

Over the course of the past several days, the invigorating experience of a good night’s sleep has escaped your grasp, interrupted by the reemergence of your chronic lower back pain.  And no matter how you’ve tossed and turned, trying to get positioned comfortably upon your worn out mattress, the nagging pain and discomfort have kept you awake.  If lower back pain has been keeping you up at night, take heart, as you are not alone.

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4 Simple Everyday Tips for Back Pain Relief

There’s an old saying that the only things that we are guaranteed in life are “death and taxes”.  Well, in today’s world we can almost add “back pain” to that list, as over 80% of us will suffer from the discomfort and inconvenience of that affliction at some point during our lives.  In fact, back pain annually strikes over 30 million people in the United States, and often without warning.  Medically, there are two classifications of back pain.  The temporary variety is classified as acute, while persistent back pain problems are said to be chronic; the latter category being the focus of this article.

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Hack Your Fitness: Lumo Run Helps Improve Your Running Form And Push Harder

Article originally posted on Forbes.com. Read original here.


The funny thing about runners is that we all think we have fine form until we snap an IT band or strain a tendon. And even then, we blame it on “going too fast” or “pushing too hard” rather than on poor run mechanics.

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6 Exercises to Beat IT Band Syndrome

The IT band is the ligament that runs down the outside of the leg, from the hip to the knee. IT band syndrome is one of the most common running injuries. Often due to overuse, it results in an irritated and inflamed IT band which can make running difficult. Stretches and icing of the IT band can help relieve some of the associated pain. However, many runners find that as soon as they continue their running routine the condition comes right back.

Symptoms often include pain located on the outside of the knee. This is often an indicator of misaligned femur movement pattern. How do we fix this? Exercises that target glute strengthening and pelvis alignment can be great combaters for IT band syndrome. The following offers 6 exercises you can do to help get you back on track and counteract that annoying IT band syndrome that just won’t quit.

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3 Exercises To Help You Achieve (Near) Perfect Running Form

Good running form helps prevent injuries from occurring. The body is made a certain way. Good posture often refers to the sitting or standing form where the muscles, tendons, and ligaments are under the least amount of strain. The same thing goes for running form. Improper technique can stress the joints and muscles, eventually causing pain and injury. Thus, it is of utmost importance to maintain good form, especially on those long runs!

There are exercises that can be done off the track that can strengthen and prepare your body to maintain good form when running. They can make you more aware of your body. They can further make your running form more efficient. Why strain muscles or overwork muscles that you don’t have to? Completing the following 3 exercises, 3 times a week may help you achieve near perfect running form.

The Seated Row

Why include an exercise for the upper body? Often runners neglect upper body exercises and opt for leg strengthening workouts. It, of course, makes sense. Strengthening and stretching of the hips and legs are important to creating a more efficient stride. However, many runners forget that good posture throughout a run is just as important. The seated row works the middle and lower trapezius muscles strengthening, often neglected, postural muscles. It keeps your spine aligned properly and prevents that improper forward hunch and forward head posture.

How To:

  1. Sit on the mat, with your legs straight in front.
  2. Wrap a resistance band around the bottoms of your feet. Hold the ends of the band in each hand with your arms straight to start.
  3. Slowly bend the elbows back along the sides of your body.
  4. At the same time, gently pinch the shoulder blades down and in.
  5. Slowly return to start and repeat 10 times for 2-3 sets.

Tips & Tricks:

  • Do not shrug the shoulders.
  • Gently contract the core to protect the low back and prevent arching of the back.
  • If sitting on the floor is difficult, sitting in a chair with the band wrapped around a post is also an option.

High Knees

The high knees drill targets the hips, glutes, and thighs, which are all major muscles used in running. Strengthening these muscles can add power and efficiency to your running form.

How To:

  1. Stand with your feet approximately hip-width apart.
  2. Bend one knee and lift it up in front of you. Your thigh should create a 90-degree angle with the trunk of your body.
  3. Lower the leg forward and alternate sides.
  4. Repeat 10 times for 2-3 sets.

Tips & Tricks:

  • Maintain a straight posture by gently contracting the core.
  • The high knee exercise can be done as a separate exercise or as a warm up prior to other exercises.

 

Chin Tucks

This exercise goes hand in hand with the seated row in preventing incorrect forward hunch or forward head posture. Chin tucks target the deep neck flexor muscles in the front of the neck. They help keep the head in line with the rest of the spine.

How To:

  1. Lie face up on a bed or mat.
  2. Without lifting the head off the mat or bed, gently nod your head.
  3. Hold for 5 seconds.
  4. Repeat 10 times for 2-3 sets.

Tips & Tricks

  • A rolled towel can be placed behind the neck for support.
  • The muscles on the side of your neck, such as the sternocleidomastoid, should be relaxed throughout the exercise.

Exercises that support good running form may prevent future injuries from occurring.  Injuries can disrupt training and put your running goals on the back burner. The 3 exercises described above may aid in improving your running form and even your posture in day-to-day activities. Remember, your work off the track is just as important as your work on the track!

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5 Essential Strength Training Exercises for Proper Running Form

Strength training is an important aspect to include in your regular workout routine. As a runner, many believe the more running the better. However, regular strength training is significant in injury prevention. Balance is key. Strengthening the muscles involved in running can support joints prone to injury from overuse. Incorporating 2-3 strengthening days a week to coincide with 2-3 running days is an effective and efficient way to improve your running form and reduce the risk of injury.

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3 Injuries That Could Be Causing Your Hip Flexor Pain

Hip flexor pain is often an injury that is hard to ignore. Our hip flexors, which lie at the front of the hip, are used in just about every movement that involves the lower half of the body. When you have hip flexor pain you feel it anytime you bend, kick, sit, run, or change directions while moving.

Typically, there are three types of injuries which result in pain to this area of the body: overuse injuries, muscle tears, and direct hits. If you are feeling hip flexor pain, consider the likelihood that one of these reasons may be the cause.

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How To Integrate Cross-Training Into Your Running Workouts

You’ve likely heard about the importance of cross-training. Greater speed, improved endurance, and reduced risk of injury are some of the frequently-touted benefits of adding cross-training into your running workouts.

But it can be overwhelming to decide which cross-training activity to add to your existing running workouts. Then there’s the time factor – between running, work, family, and friends, it can be a challenge to do it all.

Fortunately, there are a few forms of cross-training that provide maximum results with minimal time. The following activities, when strategically added to existing running workouts, will help you get stronger, improve your speed, and reduce your risk of getting injured.

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6 Resistance Band Exercises to Prevent Running Injuries

In the past few decades, running has gained speed as a popular cardio choice. Fun runs, such as foam runs, color runs, and mud runs, have made it accessible and inclusive to all. It is a great option for anyone just starting out or wanting to get back in shape. No gym equipment or membership required. All you need is a good pair of running shoes and workout clothes, and you are good to go.

However, running injuries can be discouraging, to say the least. Poor running form, muscle imbalances, or improper running shoes can all be factors contributing to an injury. Luckily, they are all completely in your control. Correct improper posture. Educate yourself and shop around for a pair of running shoes that are suited for your feet and gait. As for muscle imbalances, various resistance band exercises may reduce the risk of running injuries. The following exercises target major problem areas that may lead to injuries. By strengthening certain muscles, you may further become a more efficient and stronger runner. Always be sure to do a proper warm-up and cool down involving appropriate stretches before and after your run.

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7 Yoga Poses for Race Recovery

Running can take a toll on the body. The repetitive motion has a huge impact on our joints and muscles. It is, thus, vital to take the time after that big race to recover. Taking the necessary time to stretch and cool down may prevent running injuries, increase flexibility, and allow time for your body to return to a balanced state. Yoga is a combination of gentle static stretches and strengthening that may further support race recovery. Including these 7 yoga poses in your post-race flow can stretch out those tight muscles, improve your running form via postural correction and core activation, and reduce the risk of running injuries.

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5 Easy Ways to Prevent Hip Flexor Pain

Hip flexor injuries are common running injuries often attributed to overuse. The hip flexor muscles bring the thigh forward and up, a repetitive motion seen in running. Tight hips can cause postural deficits that may, in turn, affect running form and may cause running injuries. If the hip flexors are tight, the pelvis may rotate toward the front. This position may arch the lower back causing, even more, issues to arise.

However, hip flexor pain and injuries are highly preventable. Taking the necessary precautions may reduce the risk of the hip flexors becoming problematic. Targeted strengthening and stretching exercises, a proper warm up, and education on the topic may aid in keeping your running training plan on track.  The following outlines 5 ways to prevent common hip flexor pain, starting today.

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5 Static Stretches for After Your Run

A cool down post-run is just as important as a warm-up prior to your workout. Including a proper warm-up and cool down into your running routine may decrease the risk of running injuries. A warm up increases blood flow to the muscles and increases your heart rate. It is often recommended to include dynamic stretches into a warm-up. Dynamic stretches may enhance your running form by engaging major muscles of the core, hips, and legs.

A cool down, on the other hand, slowly brings your heart rate back down and may decrease post-run muscle soreness later on.  Incorporating static stretches, such as the following outlined below, into your cool down routine may further increase your flexibility and provide varying degrees of relief.

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