Science of Lumo Run

The Lumo Run’s lab-grade 9-axis sensor and advanced algorithms capture accurate running biomechanics through core body movements. To determine these key metrics for targeted form, Lumo Run is based on sports biomechanics research on distance running done at Loughborough University in the UK. Their state-of-the-art research has created new knowledge about running technique, identifying key characteristics for more efficient running form.

CADENCE

The target goal for this metric is to stay at or above 180 steps per minute.

Cadence, measured as steps per minute, is the term used to describe how often your foot contacts the ground during every minute. It is an important measure in running form and biomechanics because a low cadence value is often an indicator of over-striding or high bounce which leads to wasted energy and an increased risk of injury.

Lumo Run will work to progress you to this zone by only increasing your cadence by 10% at a time.

Heiderscheit, B. C., Chumanov, E. S., Michalski, M. P., Wille, C. M., & Ryan, M. B. (2011). Effects of Step Rate Manipulation on Joint Mechanics during Running. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(2), 296–302. 

BOUNCE

The target goal for this metric is to be as low as possible, ultimately at or less than 3.0 inches

Bounce, or vertical oscillation of your pelvis, refers to the up and down movement of your body while you run. The larger your bounce value is, the more energy is taken away from propelling you forward, which decreases your efficient and can increase your risk of injury.

Morin, J.B., Samozino, P., Zameziati, K., Belli, A. (2007). Effects of altered stride frequency and contact time on leg-spring behavior in human running. Journal of Biomechanics , 40(15), 3341 – 3348.

BRAKING

The target goal for this metric is to be as low as possible, ultimately at or less than 1.65 ft/s

Braking is the measure of how much your speed slows down on every step. Each time your foot hits the ground, your speed temporarily drops and then has to pick back up again for push off. This is a good measure of running efficiency, because the greater the change in your speed before and after each step, the more energy you waste slowing down and having to speed back up.

Moore, I. S. Is there an economical running technique? A review of modifiable biomechanical factors affecting running economy. (2016). Sports Medicine.  

PELVIC ROTATION

The target goal for this metric is to be as low as possible, ultimately at or less than 15 degrees

Pelvic Rotation is the side to side movement of your pelvis observed from above as you run. This is a secondary measure of over-striding as you often have to reach with your pelvis to stride forward. It is also a common issue for people that sit for a long time and have tight hip flexors.

Schache, A.G., Bennel, K.L., Blanch, P.D., Wrigley, T.V. (1999), The coordinated movement of lumbo-pelvic–hip complex during running. Gait and Posture Vol 10, 30-47.

PELVIC DROP

The target goal for this metric is to be as low as possible, ultimately at or less than 12 degrees

Pelvic Drop is the side to side lowering of your pelvis as you run and is best observed from the front of the runner. Perhaps one of the toughest of metrics to address during your run, it is directly related to common causes of injury such as lower extremity rotation, often referred to as knocked knees.

Willy, R.W., Scholz, J.P., Davis, I.S. (2012). Mirror gait retraining for the treatment of patellofemoral pain in female runners. Clinical biomechanics. 27(10):1045-51. doi: 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2012.07.011.

STRIDE LENGTH

There is no target zone for this metric.

Stride Length measures the distance between the initial ground contact of one foot to the next ground contact of the same foot. Optimal stride length is different from runner to runner, as it is a result of your individual pace and cadence. However, it is still an important measure to consider in running because over-striding is one of the most common causes of injury and a sign of inefficient running.

Moore, I. S. Is there an economical running technique? A review of modifiable biomechanical factors affecting running economy. (2016). Sports Medicine.  

GROUND CONTACT TIME

The target zone for this metric is to be as low as possible, ultimately at or below 300ms.

Ground Contact Time (GCT) measures the time your foot is in contact with the ground during each step. It’s important to have a small GCT because the larger your GCT, the longer your leg is loaded with the weight of your body — this increases your potential for injury, as well as slows you down.

Kong, P.W., De Heer, H. Anthropometric, gait and strength characteristics of Kenyan distance runners. (2008). Journal of Sports Science & Medicine. 7(4), 499 – 504.

BOARD OF ADVISORS

Bryan Heiderscheit, PhD


Renowned Biomechanist and Director of Runner's Clinic

    Matt Dixon


    Triathlete, Coach and Founder of Purplepatch Fitness

      Matt Fitzgerald


      Author, Coach, and Nutritionist

        Mark Allen


        6-time World Ironman Champion & Coach

          Meredith Kessler


          10-time Ironman Champion

            Juli Benson


            1996 Olympian and Coach

              Kristi Berg


              Head Coach at Fleet Feet Menlo Park

                Hawi Keflezighi


                Founder and Director of HAWI Management

                  IN-HOUSE EXPERTS

                  Mark Mastalir


                  Strategic Advisor

                  Mark worked for Hoka One One, a division of Deckers Outdoor Corporation, as Vice President of Marketing. He has also held global leadership positions at Reebok, NIKE, the NBA and Wrigley.

                    Rebecca Shultz


                    Ph.D in Clinical Biomechanics

                    Leveraging her 8 years of experience at the Stanford Gait Lab, Rebecca is leading the Lumo Run product experience for audio coaching and in-run cueing.