How to prevent and correct forward head posture

The human race has made some amazing technological strides in recent years. Think about it: how many intricate electronic devices do you use in the run of a day? Chances are you wake up to an alarm each morning on your smartphone, listen to music on a tiny mp3 player at the gym, and maybe check your email from a tablet during a coffee break. You might work in a cubicle in front of a computer, or at least a decent percentage of your work day probably involves looking at a computer screen. After work, perhaps you take a bus or subway home and spend the transit time looking down at your phone; sending texts, checking social media accounts, and online window shopping. Thanks to some very talented software engineers, we are able to document every minute of our lives and have the answers to all of our questions at our fingertips.

Unfortunately, with the rise of smartphones and desk jobs in our midst, we have also seen a recent surge in the prevalence of “forward head posture”, a postural condition where the cervical spine adopts a forward-leaning misalignment and can cause mild to severe neck and upper back pain 1. It can also progress into other postural conditions such as the similar upper crossed syndrome and lower back pain. Also known as “texting neck”, forward head posture is commonly found in those with seated desk jobs, poorly designed working conditions, and excessive smartphone use 2. Luckily, forward head posture can be prevented or even corrected with therapeutic exercises and stretches that target the supportive musculature of the neck. Let’s take a closer look at what forward head posture is and get into some of the preventative and corrective measures you can take to fix it. Of course, if you are unsure or feel any pain while performing any exercise, stop and seek the advice of a healthcare professional.

Your human head weighs around 10 pounds, and when standing upright with perfect posture, it is stacked evenly over your cervical vertebrae, down your thoracic and lumbar spine, over your pelvis and finally down through your legs into the center of your feet (3). That 10 pounds of skull won’t feel all that heavy when your joints are stacked. The musculature of your neck acts like guy wires in all directions with no particular muscle group doing more work than the others at any given time (4). Now picture yourself looking down at your phone with your head tilted down and sagging forward. Your skull and vertebrae are no longer stacked, and the musculature in your neck and upper back now has to work isometric overtime to hold your head in that position (5). Over time, this will develop into a constant forward head posture. Your neck vertebrae will start to creep out on an angle so that your ears are always in front of your shoulders. The muscles in the back of your neck will lengthen and weaken and their fascia will thicken, leading to soreness and knots. The muscles in the chest and front of the neck will shorten. You may start to develop neck pain, headaches, or tingling in your hands 5. You won’t even stand as tall as you did before.

The first key to preventing forward head posture is to take inventory of your postural habits. Have someone take a picture of you sitting and standing normally. Are your ears over your shoulders or in front of them? Are your shoulders rounded forward or pulled back and down to open the chest? Having these pictures can give you clues as to where to start with your prevention or correction program and also show your progress over time. It is recommended to use the series of exercises described below at least once every day. You may find it easiest and most effective to do the exercises immediately upon waking each morning and again when you are going to bed. These exercises stretch the muscles most commonly shortened in forward head posture and strengthen the muscles that have weakened to bring your head and neck back into alignment 6.

Exercise #1: Seated Chest Stretch

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Sit on the floor with your knees bent and your feet flat. Place your hands about a foot behind you and as far apart as your hips. Ideally, your fingers will face forward, but to the side is fine if you don’t have that range of motion yet. Take a soft bend in the elbows. Draw the shoulder blades back and lift the upper chest. Keep your hips on the floor. Draw your chin back so your ears are in line with your shoulders. You should feel this stretch just below your collarbones. The exercise stretches the pectoralis and brachialis muscles. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds and repeat for three repetitions.

For a deeper stretch as you progress with this exercise, you can start to slowly lift the hips straight up and away from the floor. Keep your weight in your heels and maintain your neck alignment. Eventually, your torso and upper legs will come to parallel with the floor.

Exercise #2: Upper Back Pulls On the Wall

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Stand facing a wall and place the palms of both hands at least shoulder height high on the wall in front of you. Lean forward into your hands and bend at your hips so you are shaped like an “L”. Squeeze your shoulder blades together and down your back. Pull your chin back so your ears are in line with your shoulders. This exercise trains the middle and lower trapezius muscle fibres to pull your cervical spine back into alignment. Hold the contraction for 30 seconds and repeat for three repetitions.

Exercise #3: Stretching Trapezius and Suboccipital Muscles

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While sitting or standing tall, tuck your chin into your chest and look down. Place the palms of your hands on the back of your head and gently press downward. Hold for 30 seconds. Then, rotate your right ear down slightly, maintaining the downward pressure with your hands, to stretch the left side. Hold for 30 seconds. Rotate your left ear down, maintaining downward pressure, to stretch the right side. Hold for 30 seconds. Repeat the sequence three times.

 

Exercise #4: Chin Retractions

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Begin by sitting or standing tall with your chin parallel to the ground. Keeping your chin level, use your index and middle finger on one hand (your “peace” fingers) to gently press your head back, giving yourself a double chin. Relax any tension in your jaw. Take your fingers away and try to keep your head in that position for 20 seconds. Repeat for a total of three repetitions. This exercise will train your neck musculature to retain the “ears-over-shoulders” position for optimal posture.
Prevention and early correction of forward head posture is key to eliminating neck and upper back pain. If you work a desk job, you may find it helpful to adjust your workstation to accommodate your new postural habits 7. Try to raise your computer screen to eye level and keep it about two feet away from your face to encourage proper spinal alignment. Paying close attention to your posture at work and at home, along with performing the above exercises, can help you commit to your health and wellness in just a few minutes a day.
Citations:

1. Morningstar, M. W. (2003, March 31). Cervical hyperlordosis, forward head posture, and lumbar kyphosis correction: A novel treatment for mid-thoracic pain. Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, 2(3), 111-115. doi:10.1016/s0899-3467(07)60055-x

2. Kang, J., Park, R., Lee, S., Kim, J., Yoon, S., & Jung, K. (2012). The Effect of The Forward Head Posture on Postural Balance in Long Time Computer Based Worker. Ann Rehabil Med Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine, 36(1), 98. doi:10.5535/arm.2012.36.1.98

3. Troyanovich, S. (2000). Structural rehabilitation of the spine and posture: Rationale for treatment beyond the resolution of symptoms. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 23(6), 0437-0437. doi:10.1067/mmt.2000.108138d

4. Kebaetse, M., Mcclure, P., & Pratt, N. A. (1999). Thoracic position effect on shoulder range of motion, strength, and three-dimensional scapular kinematics. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 80(8), 945-950. doi:10.1016/s0003-9993(99)90088-6

5. Borg-Stein, J. (2002). Cervical myofascial pain and headache. Current Pain and Headache Reports, 6(4), 324-330. doi:10.1007/s11916-002-0055-0

6. Bae, W., Lee, H., Shin, J., & Lee, K. (2016). The effect of middle and lower trapezius strength exercises and levator scapulae and upper trapezius stretching exercises in upper crossed syndrome. J Phys Ther Sci Journal of Physical Therapy Science, 28(5), 1636-1639. doi:10.1589/jpts.28.1636

7. Tornqvist, E. W., Hagberg, M., Hagman, M., Risberg, E. H., & Toomingas, A. (2009). The influence of working conditions and individual factors on the incidence of neck and upper limb symptoms among professional computer users. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 82(6), 689-702. doi:10.1007/s00420-009-0396-7

Invigorating Stretches to get you through your Midday Slump

By Lindsay Nova

Who doesn’t feel tired after lunch at work? Brain fog and lethargy in the afternoon are common problems many people face in the workplace or even at home. While an afternoon cup of coffee may pick you right up, there are natural alternatives that can be just as invigorating- and they don’t have any side effects! Next time you feel sluggish midday, try stretching your body instead and notice how it makes you feel. Here are some you can try today:

Open Your Heart

Stand up where ever you are with your feet in a parallel position. Place your hands on your hips and draw your elbows closer toward one another. Begin to lean back and lift your gaze upward, expanding your chest. Breathe deeply here as you extend the spine and open the chest. This stretch in the front of the neck stimulates your thyroid gland, which through the secretion of hormones, can help regulate our energy levels.

Ragdoll Forward Fold

Learn to let go of stress in this stretch. With your feet in parallel, fold forward at the hips. Bend your knees as much as you want to. Grab opposite elbows and let your head hang heavy toward the floor. Release any tension. This is also good for stimulating your thyroid to regulate your adrenals during those afternoon slumps, because it stretches the neck in the opposite direction of the first stretch.

Side Stretch

Re-invigorate your body by stretching your lungs- literally. Stand tall on both feet. Reach your arms up to the sky. Clasp your right hand over the left wrist. Pull your left arm over to the right side and feel the stretch in the left side of your body. Think of creating more space between your hips and your rib cage. Breathe deeply into your lungs, filling your body and muscles with fresh stimulating oxygen. Change your grip to stretch to the other side.

High Lunge

If you have been sitting all day, chances are your hip flexors are feeling tight. Start with your right foot forward, knee bent, and step your left foot as far back as you can, keeping the heel lifted. Hips are completely square and the front knee is bent right over the ankle so the leg is at a 90 degree angle. Reach your arms up to the sky to stretch your chest and arms, too. Make sure you do both sides!

Hamstrings + Shoulders

Step your feet wide with your toes pointed forward. Interlace your hands behind your hips, or grab a strap if your shoulders are tight. Fold forward and reach your arms overhead, keeping your hands together with the head pointed downward. Feel the stretch in the back of your legs and shoulders.
Next time you feel fatigued in the afternoon, get up and move around! Use your own body to create the energy you need to stay productive and alert throughout your day.

5 Really Great Reasons Why Good Posture Is Super Important

This article was originally featured on Huffington Post by Ann Brenoff. Read the original here

So it turns out, your mother was right after all: Good posture really matters ― even in your older years.

Slouching impacts you in ways you wouldn’t have imagined, says Dr. Charles Wang, the COO and co-founder of Lumo Bodytech, a company that has brought tech to the quest for good posture. The Lumo Lift gives you a vibrating reminder when you start to slouch. Kind of like Mom, but in the form of a wearable device.

Wang helped us compile this list of five reasons why good posture matters.

1. Bad posture can adversely impact your sex life.

Research shows that slouching ― the opposite of “power posing,” meaning standing up tall and straight ― results in low energy and low self-esteem. Standing straight up with your shoulders back and neck aligned with the rest of your spine is considered a “power pose” that can boost your energy and confidence levels. By regularly practicing good posture, you’ll feel more confident and energized in and out of the bedroom.

2.  Slouching makes you look older. 

If you’ve spent years sitting at a desk, hunched over a computer, you may be more likely to develop that unnatural hump in your neck or back resulting from “text neck.” For women, the forward slouching motion and rounding of the shoulders can cause breast sagging. To avoid your slouching from developing into skeletal or spinal issues, stay mindful of your posture in any position you’re in, whether you’re seated, standing, or walking, said Wang.

3. Bad posture can damage your back.

Yes, of course you knew that. Did you know that back pain is the second most common reason people visit the doctor every year, and poor posture is directly correlated to the increase in back pain in people who spend a great deal of their time sitting. Lumo Bodytech’s posture database research found that during an average workday, people spend as much as 38 minutes per hour slouching.

4. Poor posture can cause irregular bowel movements.

We kid you not. It’s not just your back that will feel the affects of your slouching ― your intestines will take a hit, too. Having good posture means your stomach and intestines can easily push food through ― but poor posture can cause your gastrointestinal system to lock up or function poorly. Research has also shown that people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome who suffer from bloating and gas can ease their symptoms by standing up straight.

5. Bad posture makes you more selfish.

Research shows that sitting upright helps reduce self-focus, allowing you to tune in more on the needs and emotions of the people around you.

Lumo Lift Success Story: This Dental Hygienist uses Lumo Lift to prevent back pain

Guest post from Lumo Lift user, Christine B. 

I have been working as a Registered Dental Hygienist for eight years. One of the symptoms known to my profession is back problems. It is difficult to have patients lay in the proper position, which causes me to do a lot of hunching over and leaning. I found myself exploring options to prevent future back problems as I am still fairly young. I came across Lumo lift on one of my professional dental hygiene pages that I belong to and decided to purchase one for myself.

One of the big selling points was the price.  I began to use the lumo lift daily at work and as expected, I was doing a lot of slouching and needed to correct my posture. The gentle buzzing reminder often corrects me. I’ve found that the longer I used it, the more I could anticipate when it would correct me and found I was already correcting myself.

I like that it has different options for me to wear it It came with two different colors to wear outside my shirt so I can have it blend with my scrubs and be discreet if I do choose. I’ve had a lot of coworkers and friends ask me about it and I love to spread the word. Not only to colleagues but also to friends because it seems bad posture is a problem for a lot of people.

I’m now noticing more and more that my back pain has become less and less. I don’t ever leave for work without my lumo lift. I’m also impressed with the many features it includes. The lumo lift doesn’t need to be charged every day and also charges quickly. So there is an option on the super helpful app that lets me know how much battery life is left so that I know when I need to charge.

Overall I think that this was an incredible investment in myself, my career and my health. I find myself feeling better and happier and posture is extremely important in my life. I recommend this product every time someone asks me about it or mentions any type of back pain or posture products. I’m sure this product is very helpful for everyday life and other careers and jobs as well, but for dental professionals it’s pretty much a necessity. Lumo lift has changed my life and I will continue to wear and use it every day.

Customer Success Story: How one developer used Lumo Lift to practically eliminate back pain

Programer slouching

Guest post by Lumo Lift user Tim H.

I am a professional software developer and have “programmers hunch” even though I have tried different reminder software tools to sit up straighter.

In addition, I have suffered from mid back pain resulting from a house move in 2008. Massage and chiropractic relieved the pain somewhat, but only temporarily.

When I read about Lumo Lift, I was really impressed by the potential of having a constant companion to remind me to fix my posture! I bought one shortly thereafter.

In the mornings after I exercise, I put on my Lumo and align it. It helps me sit up straight in the car for my commute. When I’m in the office, I (now instinctively!) align it when I sit down or stand up. Every now and then I get a gentle buzz reminding me to fix my posture. When I’m at home, I keep it on and get little reminders to sit/stand properly.

When I go to bed at night, I put the Lumo in my gym bag for the next day (I keep a portable USB charger in my bag to keep my exercise gadgets charged without needing an outlet, so the Lumo Lift uses that if necessary).

In the two months since I’ve been using it, I feel better! I feel taller for one thing, my mid-back pain has almost entirely disappeared (who knew it was posture!!) and both my massage therapist and chiropractor noted that my shoulders are much easier to manipulate and sit in a much better position naturally. It feels great to know that my posture is getting better after so many years of knowing that I had to improve it but failing to stay on top of the problem.

The Lumo Lift is also an interesting conversation piece! My family, friends, and strangers strike conversations if they happen to notice the magnetic back. When I explain what it’s for and show them the Lumo Lift and Android app, they universally exclaim that they want one too. It seems that poor posture is a common problem!

I did develop one small issue with my Lumo Lift and had to contact support. They were very prompt, helpful, and did eventually send me a replacement with no charge or hassles. That’s pretty rare these days!

I am extremely happy with my Lumo Lift, and use it all of the time. It’s one of the best purchases I’ve made in years, and I recommend it for anybody who wants to improve their posture, suffers from back pain, or just wants to look more confident and poised!

The Fundamental Importance of Good Posture

Guest post by Dr. Tim Errington, Chiropractor, Author, Speaker. He currently practices at Total Health Chiropractic, Singapore.

When most of us consider health and the things that keep us healthy, few will put posture anywhere near the top of the list. It remains probably the most underrated and underreported cause of failing health. This is indeed unfortunate because if you think about it, you have never seen anyone with poor posture radiating health and vitality. The harsh reality is there for anyone to see – lose your posture and you lose your health. All those years of our parents telling us to sit up straight and not slouch, was indeed very, very good advice.

Every Bride’s Guide to Perfect Posture

Like many brides, wedding planning started long before you got engaged. You’ve thought about your dress, the venue, the colors, who will be in your bridal party and everything in between. But what about your posture? Posture is easy to neglect and forget about, but in reality it’s one of the most important aspects of your wedding day. Standing up straight with your shoulders back will not only make you look thinner in your dress, it will also help keep you feeling confident and in control – things every bride strives for on what is often a chaotic and emotional day. So take the time to invest in yourself and commit to beautiful posture starting today.

Stand Up Straight to Look and Feel Great

In case you haven’t noticed, we take good posture pretty seriously here at Lumo Bodytech. We often get asked why we care about posture so much – are we just a company full of ex-ballerinas and people who got aggressively nagged by their grandmothers to stand up straight? Although the answer to that question is no, we think that those nagging grandmothers are on to something! A growing body of research indicates that there are countless reasons to care about your posture.

Back Health for Students: 3 Tips to Keep You Standing Tall on Campus

If you’ve ever been a student , chances are you’ve dealt with back, neck and shoulder pain that comes with lugging around heavy books, laptops and other necessities. Starting from an early age, students are made to carry potentially harmful amounts of weight in their backpacks. An amount of weight that unfortunately tends to increase as we move from grade to grade. 

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