Demystifying the Quantified Self

Demystifying the Quantified Self

Image source: http://schedule.sxsw.com/2013/events/event_IAP15589

Image source: http://schedule.sxsw.com/2013/events/event_IAP15589

You may have heard the term “Quantified Self” being thrown around recently; we use it quite a bit ourselves here at LUMOback. But what does it mean? And how can it help you improve your life?

What is the “Quantified Self” Movement?

As technology advances at a dizzying pace, our ability to monitor and track the many aspects of our daily lives is growing. While the human desire to track and monitor our health and habits is nothing new, technology has made it easier than ever to do so. We’re now able to passively collect and record valuable data about ourselves. From fitness to finance to mood changes (to posture!), there’s an app or device to track just about anything. Surfacing this data via devices and apps has become increasingly popular and has grown into the “Quantified Self” movement.

The term “Quantified Self” was first coined in 2007 by editors at Wired Magazine and refers to the collection and processing of data about one’s daily life. The community of devoted self-trackers is ever expanding, with meetups and conferences in dozens of cities around the world.

Why Track?

The technology involved in the Quantified Self movement empowers people with heightened self-awareness and supports us as we strive to be the best possible versions of ourselves. Collecting data about ourselves allows us to make informed decisions about our daily behavior.

For example, collecting information about your food intake, productivity and mood could help you understand how the food you consume affects your body. Does your morning latte actually make you more productive? Does that 3pm candy bar send you into a grumpy 4pm slump? The ability to draw connections between your behaviors can help you understand yourself better and make the smartest decisions possible.

LUMOback Activity Tracking

LUMOback Activity Tracking

Turning these valuable insights into actionable data can encourage us to make small behavior changes that result in big improvements in overall health. For example, tracking the number of steps you take each day can help you become more aware of your daily activity and lead you to strive to be more active.

After all, we can all use a little bit of extra help for health!

 

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Tansy

About Tansy

Tansy wears research, public relations and partnership hats at Lumo BodyTech. She is passionate about harnessing technology to support personal behavior change. Tansy’s background is in wearable tech and social entrepreneurship. She graduated from the University of Colorado with a BA in Social Marketing.

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