Lumo Run Guest Post: Getting il-LUMO-nated! Part 1

Guest post from Lumo Run user, Susan Oyler. You can read the original post on her blog ESSENTIAL OYL.

Last month, I was awarded a Lumo.Run smart running sensor as a runner-up prize from the #ThisIsMyCoach contest.  Upon delivery, I quickly tore into the box and started getting acquainted with my new gadget.  You clip this powerful little device on the back of your shorts and it analyzes your run form based on several metrics:
•    Cadence (how frequently your foot contacts the ground, per minute)
•    Bounce (also known as vertical oscillation, is the up and down movement that your body experiences while you run)
•    Braking (the change in forward speed experienced by your body during a step)
•    Drop (the side to side motion of the pelvis)
•    Rotation (the twisting motion of the pelvis)

As an engineer, I believe the more gadgets, the better!  I LOVE data and digging into numbers.  Also, as an engineer, I know that no patterns can be established from a single data point.  In order to properly identify patterns in my run form, I decided to put in a month of running with my sensor and reviewing the data.  As a busy mom who frequently forgets things, I LOVE that this device is waterproof and will survive the wash cycle (I’ve been guilty of leaving it clipped on the back of my shorts)!

After my first run with the sensor, I was REALLY nervous to look at the analysis.  I was worried it was going to tell me I was a MESS!  I was happy to see that my form reflects my running background.  For the five different criteria, my numbers were pretty much at, or near, the threshold values.  Phew!

It was really interesting looking at the data from this past month.  Especially comparing my slow, easy runs to my fast, interval runs.  The two run types produced different areas for improvement.  For my slower runs, my cadence was a bit below the lower threshold of 180 spm.   For my faster runs, my bounce moderately exceeded the threshold value of 3.30 inches.  The criteria that was frequently exceeded for both the slow and fast runs was braking (threshold value of 1.31 ft/s).

With solid data collected and trends established, I have now identified the areas that need improvement.  That’s the other great thing about the Lumo.Run sensor.  It does more than just provide you analysis.  It provides you exercises and drills to work on to improve your specific issues with your run form.  And now that I’ve completed my last race for the season, I have more time to work on improving swim/bike/run efficiency and strength.

 Over the next month or two, I am going to focus on the drills and exercises recommended by the app and follow up with a second post to detail my progress to improve my run form.


Is Your Cell Phone Killing Your Back?

This article was originally published on by Joshua M. Ammerman, MD

Millions of people do it throughout the day and are totally unaware that cell phone use can be detrimental to the back. Did you know that cell phone use can double or triple the weight of your head and can strain your neck? If you are reading this article on a cell phone or tablet, you are probably doing it right now:Tilting your head forward and down in order to look at your device.

Cell phones and tablets are changing the way we access information and entertainment. The use of these devices influences our posture and body mechanics in unhealthy ways that contribute to neck, upper back, shoulder, and arm pain. Furthermore, poor posture while sitting, standing, walking, or in a static position can lead to more than upper body pain and stiffness—poor posture affects other parts of the spine, such as the middle and low back.

How much does a human head weigh?
Typically, an adult human head weighs between 10 and 12 pounds. As the head tilts or angles forward, the cervical spine’s (neck) muscles, tendons, and ligaments support the head during movement and when static; such as holding the head in a forward tilted position. Even the neck’s intervertebral discs are involved and help absorb and distribute the forces exerted on the neck.

How much heavier is the human head when tilted forward?
To find out, Kenneth K. Hansraj, MD, Chief of Spine Surgery at New York Spine Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, created a computer model of the cervical spine. In an article published in Surgical Technology International, he reported that this model showed that the strain on your neck rises as the forward angle of your head increases.

  • At 15 degrees of forward tilt may equate to a head weighing 27 pounds.
  • At 30 degrees forward, the strain on the neck equals a 40 pound head.
  • The greater the angle, the greater the strain: 45 degrees forward equals 49 pounds of strain, and 60 degrees forward equals 60 pounds.

Now consider the fact that the average person is holding his or her head forward to look at a phone or read a tablet for 2 to 4 hours a day, according to Dr. Hansraj. Teenagers spend even more time each day looking down at their devices, he added. As you tilt your head, you also move your shoulders forward into a rounded position, which is another aspect of poor posture. All this excess strain creates extra wear and tear on the structures of the neck, upper spine and back, and contributes to/can lead to spinal degeneration that may require surgery.

Postural awareness a positive first step
Making good posture a habit can help prevent neck or back pain from developing, along with related posture and biomechanical problems. Good posture means that your head is upright, your ears are in line with your shoulders, and your shoulder blades are down and retracted.

“In proper alignment, spinal stress is diminished. It is the most efficient position for the spine,” Dr. Hanraj said. Good posture is not only good for the health of your spine; it is good for your over-all health and mood as well as, Dr. Hansraj noted. Other researchers have found that standing straight elevates testosterone and serotonin levels and decreases cortisol levels, hormones that affect your mood, he reported.

However, modern life still requires you to check your phone or use your tablet many times a day. How do you do that and safeguard your neck?

  • First, don’t use your cell phone or your tablet for extended computer work, according to Stanford University’s Environmental Health and Safety Department.
  • Use your desktop or laptop computer for extended work and make sure these devices are arranged ergonomically.
  • When you use a cell phone, instead of bending your head to look down at it, raise your phone.
  • When you are reading the screen, bring the phone up level or just a little below your face.


Ready To Lift?

Start your positive habit change today with Lumo Lift

Lumo Lift is a small lightweight wearable that tracks and coaches you on your posture, as well as tracks daily activity, such as steps taken, distance traveled and calories burned. Compatible with iOS/iPhone, Windows desktop and select Android devices. Free shipping, 30-day money back guarantee and 1 year limited warranty.



Subscribe to the Lumo Newsletter

Sign up for our newsletter and be the first to know about new articles, trends, products, discounts and latest Lumo news! Enter your email address below:


All-New Lumo Lift App Available Now

You asked, we listened! Today we are excited to announce major updates to the Lumo Lift app, including a fresh new design, simpler settings for alignment and more. The new Lumo Lift app is available now on Google Play and the Apple App Store, so update now and be on your way to better posture.

Questions Every Runner Should Ask: A Q&A with Dr. Rebecca Shultz

Image source: Lifehacker

Running isn’t always as simple as lacing up your shoes and hitting the road. Whether you’re training for your first 5K or your tenth marathon, chances are that you will face some challenge during your running career, such as an injury or a setback in your performance. At this point, it’s critical to ask questions and find the resources that will steer you in the right direction.

Every Bride’s Guide to Perfect Posture

Like many brides, wedding planning started long before you got engaged. You’ve thought about your dress, the venue, the colors, who will be in your bridal party and everything in between. But what about your posture? Posture is easy to neglect and forget about, but in reality it’s one of the most important aspects of your wedding day. Standing up straight with your shoulders back will not only make you look thinner in your dress, it will also help keep you feeling confident and in control – things every bride strives for on what is often a chaotic and emotional day. So take the time to invest in yourself and commit to beautiful posture starting today.

Introducing Lindsey Scherf

We’ve got exciting news! Here at Lumo, we are so excited to welcome and announce our newest team member to our Lumo Run Product Team, Lindsey Scherf. Lindsey came to us after she heard about the launch of Lumo Run back in November and wanted to be a part of the development as she saw the potential benefit for so many runners. Leveraging her background in Kinesiology and her experience as an elite runner, Lindsey is now a full member of our product team as well as our first ever sponsored athlete.

1 2 3 6